Articles

By: Bill Spencer — October 23, 2019

5G is Everywhere at this Massive L.A. Tech Conference

October 22, 2019

Dateline: Los Angeles, CA

Just a quick update for you...

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I'll be spending the better part of the week at the MWC2019 conference at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

This trip is part of my ongoing mission to spot the world's best emerging high-tech trends while there's the most meat on the bone.  That is, before they find their way into the mainstream.

I'm also here to catch up with old friends and contacts and make a few dozen more.

Needless to say I'm having the time of my life, doing what I love most.  In the short video below, I'm under a pair of next generation Virtual Reality googles, "riding" on the strut of a Cobra helicopter as it "flies" 7,000 above Encino, CA.

(Click lower right arrow to play video)

This miracle was made possible by a consortium of Taiwanese firms operating under the umbrella name dp smart technology co. (yes, the 'd' and the 'p' in the name are lower case).

If I sound a little anxious in that short clip, it's because I was.

That simulation was so lifelike I had to keep one hand on David, the fellow on my right who created the experience, to keep from losing my balance and falling to the floor as the copter made its virtual turns.

I've already collected a stack of business cards three inches high.  The halls of the L.A. center are bursting with technology CEOs, CIOs, inventors and designers, visionaries and promoters of every stripe.

Together this group forms a "Who's Who" of Artificial Intelligence... 5G Wireless... Virtual Reality... Cloud computing... Cyber Security... Deep Learning... Accelerated Computing and the Internet of Things...

All the hottest cutting-edge frontiers of technology.

The gentleman next to me, here, is Michael Gotlieb, the CEO of Solace Power, a player in the exploding 5G field.

His company uses a what Michael calls a "less invasive" technology that lets Solace transmit 60 watts of wireless power and data through 300 millimeters (about 12 inches) of concrete.

Gotlieb_And_Me

Michael is a rare breed -- an engineer and visionary with a taste for running a business.  "I'm a person who likes to transform companies," he told me.

To date Solace Power has worked alongside giants such as Boeing and BMW.

"We're an infrastructure play", Gotlieb told me.

"5G is going to have a challenge getting through walls and windows.  Right now the Verizon install is to cut through those walls and windows.  That will lower deployment.  For 5G to be successful, it's gonna need lots of nodes.  What we're offering is the ability to self-install and to rapidly deploy 5G.  We're all about rapid, non-invasive, lower-cost self-install".

"This is not just 5G.  Right now we're doing medical markets, automotive markets, IoT..."

When I mentioned cyber security Michael's eyes lit up.  "This is also a real nice play on that.  We can tell when something that shouldn't be drawing that much power is drawing power.  Because when something is under attack it draws more  power.  It's much easier for us to stop the attack.  This is something we also bring to the table".

Solace Power is a private firm.  When I asked the CEO if any public companies had made overtures about acquiring Solace, he just smiled and said, "We'll see", adding, "There's a lot of activity.  This is a very healthy space".

It's truly mind-boggling how much capital and manpower is going into 5G right now.  Practically everyone I spoke with described the idea of a "5G revolution" as "a done deal".

Everyone is vying to be the first with a breakthrough product in the 5G space, and it's stunning how many ways 5G can be put to use.

Over at the Ericsson (ERIC) station I spoke with Brendan, a guitar player, and member of the company's product demonstration team.

Brendan was there, guitar over his shoulders, getting ready to perform with a drummer who was set up on the other side of the convention center, thousands of yards away.

The two musicians were able to play in perfect time with one another, despite the distances separating them.  The reason was that Ericsson's 5G technology has an incredibly low "latency".  That means there's virtually no delay when transmitting the drummer's "signal" wirelessly from far away.

Not all the genius at MWC2019 are working to build out new exotic hardware.  Software mavens are thick on the ground as well.

I sat and talked with both co-founders of a company called Atom Beam that "shrinks, secures and speeds data".

Atom Beam

That's CTO Asghar Riahi on my left and CEO Charles Yeomans on my right.

The CTO has patented an ingenious method for reducing the amount of data that has to be sent in order to accomplish a particular task.

The secret is: all possible messages a sender could want to transmit are collected into a "table".  The sender only has to transmit a tiny amount of data -- just enough data to tell the receiver of the message where in the table he or she can find that particular message the sender wishes to communicate.

One trucking company, after outfitting their fleet of 700 trucks with Atom Beam's technology, cut their data transmission costs from $3,500,000 down to less than $300,000 -- a savings of 92%.

Check back tomorrow as I report back to you on what I'm discovering during this whirlwind tour of tomorrow's transformative blockbuster companies.

Thanks for reading,

Bill

Bill_TheKeys

 

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